Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Please enter your email address to sign in to the Mobile Compliance Guide


Login with your Brooks Account email




Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

For More Information
The Brooks Equipment Mobile Compliance Guide puts industry standards on various fire safety products at your fingertips.
For up-to-date catalog pricing, check out our Pocket Price Guide. Just click the Pocket Price Guide button, in the bottom menu, then login using your Brooks account number.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Help Menu
Thank you for using the Brooks Equipment Mobile Compliance Guide.

Login
Use your Brooks Account email. For any questions on your account, please contact your Brooks Account Manager or call us at 800.826.3473.

Issues
To make a comment or suggestion, or report a problem, email MarketingSupport@BrooksEquipment.com.

Copyright
The Brooks Equipment Mobile Compliance Guide is a product of Brooks Equipment Company, LLC. © 2020 Brooks Equipment. All rights reserved.

Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

The Mobile Compliance Guide is an exclusive benefit of being a Brooks Rewards member.

If you would like access to this program/app and many other benefits, please enroll as a rewards member by emailing or calling your Brooks Account Manager. Thank You!
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Backflow Preventers




Backflow Preventer Installation Requirements
Chapter 6 of the International Plumbing Code (IPC) and Chapter 3 of the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) have requirements to install backflow preventers to keep drinking water piping systems safe. These model codes are adopted as state or local plumbing codes. The codes have specific details for the type of backflow preventers that are required. These codes also have the installation requirements for backflow preventers installed for fire protection.

Testing and Internal Inspections
Backflow prevention assemblies are mechanical devices that get tested when they are initially installed and annually thereafter. Chapter 3 of the International Plumbing Code (IPC) and Chapter 6 of the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) address the inspection and testing of backflow prevention assemblies, including annual inspections and annual testing.

Backflow preventers installed in fire sprinkler systems have the tendency to fail closed, because they are not exercised for long periods of time. Chapter 13 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires an annual forward flow test. That test also ensures there is enough water in a fire condition. Additionally, Chapter 13 of NFPA 25 requires backflow preventers to be inspected internally every 5 years so they operate correctly, move freely, and are in good condition. During inspection, certain parts are routinely replaced and other parts are identified for replacement.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Extinguishers & Chemical


Portable fire extinguishers, in general, are installed as the first line of defense against fires of small or otherwise manageable size. NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, provides minimum requirements for selecting, installing, inspecting, maintaining, and testing of extinguishers. Chapter 5 of NFPA 10 requires that the selection of extinguishers be based on the following factors:

(1) Type of potential fire.
(2) Size of potential fire.
(3) Hazards in the potential fire area.
(4) Energized electrical equipment in the potential fire area.
(5) Ambient temperature in the potential fire area.

Chapter 5 of NFPA 10 also requires a fire extinguisher, listed and labeled for Class K fires, be provided to protect cooking appliances that use combustible cooking media. Class K fires are fires in cooking appliances that involve combustible cooking media (vegetable or animal oils and fats).
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Cabinets, Accessories, & Covers
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Cabinets, Accessories, & Covers
Cabinets




Chapter 6 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that hand portable fire extinguishers be installed in one of the following ways:

(1) In a cabinet.An extinguisher cabinet is an extinguisher housing device designed to store and protect the extinguisher.
(2) On a hangerAn extinguisher hanger is a mounting device designed for mounting a specific extinguisher model onto a stationary vertical surface. intended for the extinguisher.
(3) In a wall recess.
(4) In the bracket supplied by the manufacturer.
(5) In a listed bracket intended for the extinguisher.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Cabinets, Accessories, & Covers
Cabinet Accessories


Chapter 6 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. Extinguisher cabinets are not permitted to be locked except where there is a potential for malicious use. Cabinets that are allowed to be locked must be provided with an emergency means to access the extinguisher. Extinguisher cabinets with break-front panels are required to be provided with breaker bars or hammers. Cabinets with missing breaker bars or hammers are required to be replaced. Cabinets with broken, damaged, or missing scored-panels are required to have the panels replaced.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Hose, Nozzles, Brass, & Fire Dept. Connections
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Hose, Nozzles, Brass, & Fire Dept. Connections
Handwheels, Valves, Adapters, Caps, & Plugs



NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, provides minimum requirements for inspection, testing, and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems. Chapter 13 requires that all hose connection pressure reducing valves must be inspected at least once a year. The condition of the following parts must be checked:

(1) Valve handwheel.
(2) Valve outlet hose threads.
(3) Hose adapter and cap.

Corrective action must be taken where any of the components are damaged or the handwheel or cap is missing. Other problems, such as valve leakage or improper operation of the reducer are cause for maintenance or replacement.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Hose, Nozzles, Brass, & Fire Dept. Connections
Rack & Reel Covers


In accordance with Chapter 4 of NFPA 1962, Standard for the Inspection, Care, and Use of Fire Hose, Couplings, and Nozzles and the Service Testing of Fire Hose, all fire hose stored on racks or reels must be protected from the following:

(1) The weather.
(2) Any other detrimental environmental factors that could adversely affect the hose.
(3) Potential heat exposure.
(4) Possible mechanical damage.

When choosing an enclosure to protect occupant-use hose, the enclosure must be constructed and allow the hose to be stored in accordance with NFPA 24, Standard for the Installation of Private Fire Service Mains and Their Appurtenances.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Hose, Nozzles, Brass, & Fire Dept. Connections
Nozzles




Chapter 6 of NFPA 1962, Standard for the Inspection, Care, and Use of Fire Hose, Couplings, and Nozzles and the Service Testing of Fire Hose, requires that fire hose nozzles must be inspected annually after each use. Where a nozzle fails an inspection, it must be removed from service and repaired or replaced.

29 CFR Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart l, Fire Protection

Section 1910.158, Standpipe and Hose Systems

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.158, Standpipe and Hose Systems, to ensure that standpipe hoses are equipped with shutoff-type nozzles.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Hose, Nozzles, Brass, & Fire Dept. Connections
Knox Caps



NFPA 13, Chapter 16 requires fire department connections to be equipped with approved plugs or caps, properly secured and arranged for easy removal by fire departments.

Corrective action must be taken where missing plugs or caps are discovered. Fire departments in many cities and towns allow the installation of Knox Locking Caps. Click here for a list of pre-approved cities.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Lockout/Tagout
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Personal Protection Equipment
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
First Aid


29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart K, Medical and Health Standards

Section 1910.151, Medical Services and First Aid

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.151, Medical Services and First Aid, to ensure there is ready access to medical personnel for advice and consultation on matters of plant health. If an infirmary, clinic, or hospital is not close to the workplace, where injured employees can be treated, then a person(s) must be adequately trained to provide first aid. Additionally, first aid supplies must be readily available. Where a person's body or eyes can be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, appropriate facilities must be provided within the work area for quickly drenching or flushing of the eyes and body. The emergency area must be available for immediate emergency use.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Fire Alarms




Chapter 17 of NFPA 72®, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, requires a conspicuous, unobstructed, and accessible location for all manual fire alarm boxes. Additionally, all manual fire alarm boxes must be within 5 ft (1.5 m) of each exit doorway on all floor levels. When grouped openings over 40 ft (12.2 m) wide are provided, manual fire alarm boxes must be mounted within 5 ft (1.5 m) of each side of the grouped openings. The travel distance from any point to a manual fire alarm box must not exceed 200 ft (61 m) on any floor. Additional manual fire alarm boxes must be installed where this travel distance could be exceeded. The initiating device of the manual fire alarm box must be suitably protected if it is in a location that is subject to mechanical damage.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Eye Protection



29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment

Section 1910.133, Eye and Face Protection

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.133, Eye and Face Protection, to ensure that all affected employees are provided with and use adequate eye or face protection when exposed to eye or face hazards that may arise from acids, caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, flying particles, molten metal, potentially injurious light radiation, or other eye and face hazards. When flying objects are a possibility, the employer is responsible for the employee to use face protection that also prevents objects flying in from the side (i.e., eyewear side protectors or a shield). Detachable side protectors are an acceptable solution for meeting this mandate.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Hearing Protection


29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart G, Occupational Health and Environmental Control

Section 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure, to take into account their employees' hearing protection when providing a safe workplace. If employees are subjected to sound levels exceeding those listed in Table G-16 of 29 CFR 1910.95 Subpart G, then feasible administrative or engineering controls must be put in place. Personal protective equipment must be provided by the employer and used by the affected employees to reduce sound levels, if administrative or engineering controls fail to reduce sound levels within the levels of Table G-16.


29 CFR 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart E, Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

Section 1926.101, Hearing Protection

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1926.101, Hearing Protection, to provide hearing protective devices and affected employees must use the devices where reducing either the noise levels or the duration of exposures to specified sound levels in Table D-2 of 29 CFR 1926.52 is not reasonable or feasible. 29 CFR 1962.101 states that plain cotton is not an acceptable protective device. Protective devices inserted into the ear are permitted to be used where fitted or determined individually by competent persons.

Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Lockout/Tagout Centers

29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart J, General Environmental Controls

Section 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout), to establish a program and develop and use procedures for attaching appropriate lockout or tagout devices and otherwise disable machinery or equipment to ensure unexpected energization, startup, or release of stored energy to prevent injury to employees.

29 CFR 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart K, Electrical

Section 1926.417, Lockout and Tagging of Circuits

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1926.417, Lockout and Tagging of Circuits, to provide tags on controls that are to be deactivated during the course of work on energized or de-energized equipment or circuits. Employers are also mandated to render the equipment or circuits inoperative and provide tags on all points where such equipment or circuits can be energized. These tags must be strategically and conspicuously placed to clearly identify the affected equipment or circuits.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Electrical & Valve Lockouts




29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart J, General Environmental Controls

Section 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)

This section of 29 CFR 1910 applies to the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment where a sudden startup or surprise energization as well as a sudden release of stored energy could cause injury to workers. This federal mandate establishes minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Padlocks


29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart J, General Environmental Controls

Section 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)

Definition of "Capable of being locked out."

An energy isolating device is capable of being locked out if it has a hasp or other means of attachment to which, or through which, a lock can be affixed, or it has a locking mechanism built into it. Other energy isolating devices are capable of being locked out, if lockout can be achieved without the need to dismantle, rebuild, or replace the energy-isolating device or permanently alter its energy control capability.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Head Protection


29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment

Section 1910.135, Head Protection

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.135, Head Protection, to provide and ensure the wearing of a protective helmet for each affected employee where the potential for head injury from falling objects exists. The employer is mandated to provide and ensure the wearing of a protective helmet, designed to reduce electrical shock hazards, by each affected employee, where the employee is near exposed electrical conductors that could contact the head. Head protection must comply with ANSI Z89.1.

29 CFR 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart E, Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

Head protection must comply with the following criteria found in:

ANSI Z89.1, Standard for Industrial Head Protection.
  • The helmets provided by the employer for the protection of employees against impact and penetration of both falling and flying objects must meet the criteria of ANSI Z89.1, Type I.
  • The helmets provided by the employer for the protection of employees against impact and penetration of falling and flying objects must meet the criteria of ANSI Z89.1, Type II.
  • The helmets provided by the employer for the head protection of employees exposed to high voltage electrical shock and burns must meet the criteria of ANSI Z89.1, Class E.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Fall Protection



29 CFR 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart M, Fall Protection

Section 1926.501, Duty to Have Fall Protection

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1926.501, Duty to Have Fall Protection, to provide protection from falling wherever an employee is working or walking on a surface with an edge or side that is not protected with a wall and is 6 ft (1.8 m) or more above a lower level. Employers are permitted to provide and install guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems to comply with this mandate. Body belts are not acceptable as part of a personal fall arrest system.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Respiratory Protection



29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment

Section 1910.134, Respiratory Protection

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection, to provide respirators where such equipment is necessary to protect the health of employees. Additionally, the employer is mandated to provide respirators to employees where effective engineering control measures are not feasible or while they are being instituted.

In the control of occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the employer is mandated to prevent atmospheric contamination, as far as feasible, by accepted engineering control measures (for example, enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials).
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Safety Products
Clothing





29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards
Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment

Section 1910.132, General Requirements

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1910.132, General Requirements, to provide personal protective equipment to employees wherever environment hazards, chemical hazards, radiological hazards, or mechanical irritants can cause injury or impairment to an employee through absorption, inhalation, or physical contact. Where these hazards exist, the employer is mandated to provide protective equipment for eyes, face, head, and extremities, protective clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers. The employer is mandated to maintain this equipment in a sanitary and reliable condition, or it must be replaced with new equipment. The employee must use and maintain the equipment in a sanitary manner.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Sprinklers




Chapter 5 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that all sprinklers be visually inspected from the floor level on an annual basis. The sprinkler inspector must check for the following:

(1) Sprinklers that show signs of leakage or physical damage.
(2) Sprinklers that show corrosion that is detrimental to performance.
(3) Sprinklers that have a loss of fluid in the glass bulb.
(4) Sprinklers that have loading that is detrimental to performance.
(5) Sprinklers that were painted by someone other than the manufacturer.

Where these improper conditions exist, Chapter 5 of NFPA 25 mandates that the problematic sprinklers must be replaced. Sprinklers must only be replaced by new, listed sprinklers of the same style, orifice, size, temperature range, thermal response characteristics, deflector type (e.g., upright, pendent, sidewall), and K-factor. Sprinklers are not permitted to be altered in any respect or have paint or other coatings put on them after being shipped from the manufacturer.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Sprinkler Tools & Accessories


Chapter 5 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems , provides requirement for special tools for sprinklers. A special sprinkler wrench, designed specifically for each type of sprinkler installed on the premises must be provided and kept in the spare sprinkler storage cabinet for use in removal and installation of sprinklers.

An annual inspection of the spare sprinkler supply is required to ensure that the proper number and type of sprinklers as well as at least one correct sprinkler wrench for each type of sprinkler is available.

Chapter 5 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that at least six spare sprinklers must always be on the premises, allowing any sprinklers that operated or were damaged to be replaced expediently. The sprinklers kept in reserve are also mandated to correspond to the types and temperature ratings of those sprinklers they will be replacing. While they are not in use, the spare sprinklers are to be kept in a spare sprinkler storage cabinet, where the temperature is regulated or otherwise ensured against rising above the maximum allowable ceiling temperature of the sprinklers stored in the cabinet. When considering premises with a large number of sprinklers, Chapter 5 of NFPA 25 also stipulates the minimum number of spare sprinklers that must be on hand as follows:
  • 6 sprinklers for facilities with less than 300 sprinklers.
  • 12 sprinklers for facilities with 300 to 1000 sprinklers.
  • 24 sprinklers for facilities that have over 1000 sprinklers.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Gauges

Chapter 13 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that, every 5 years, sprinkler system gauges must either be replaced or tested by comparing the gauge with a calibrated gauge. The gauges must be accurate to within 3 percent of their full scale. Gauges found to be outside of that range must be replaced or recalibrated.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Waterflow & Alarm Devices

Chapters 5 and 6 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, provide minimum requirements for testing of alarm devices for sprinkler systems. Quarterly testing is required for mechanical waterflow devices. A water motor gong is one example of a device that would need to be tested quarterly. According to Chapter 5 of NFPA 25, semiannual testing of vane-type or pressure switch-type waterflow devices is required. Additionally, the low air pressure supervisory devices must be tested quarterly in accordance with Chapter 13 of NFPA 25.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Signs

Chapter 6 of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, requires that weatherproof metal or rigid plastic identification signs be provided with all control, drain, venting, and test connection valves.

Chapter 13 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that hydraulically designed system nameplates must be inspected quarterly to verify that they are legible and remain securely attached. Each control valve must have a sign identifying it and the system or portion of the system that it controls.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Escutcheons

Chapter 6 of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, mandates where escutcheons are used with recessed, flush-type, or concealed sprinklers, they must be part of a listed sprinkler assembly.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Fire Department Connection Signs


Chapter 16 of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems requires that signs must be provided for all fire department connections. Signs must have raised or engraved letters that are at least 1 in. (25.4 mm) high on a plate. Signs with the words (or abbreviations) AUTO SPKR, STANDPIPE, and OPEN SPKR are a few examples that would comply with this requirement.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Sprinkler Accessories & Standpipe Equipment
Supervisory Equipment
Chapter 13 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that every normally open valve must be secured with a seal or lock, and every normally closed valve must be secured with a seal. Alternatively, they are permitted to be electrically supervised.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Smoke Alarms



Chapter 9 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, specifies that single and multiple-station smoke alarms, which are required by other sections of the Code, must be in accordance with NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, unless they comply with specific paragraphs of Chapter 9 of NFPA 101.

Chapter 29 of NFPA 72 provides minimum requirements for smoke alarms. Where required by another document, such as state or local laws, codes, or standards for a particular occupancy, approved single- and/or multiple-station smoke alarms must be installed in the following locations:

(1) In all sleeping areas and guest rooms.
(2) Outside all sleeping areas of dwelling units [within 21 ft (6.4 m) along the travel path from the door].
(3) On every floor level of dwelling units, including basements.
(4) On every floor level and in the living areas of residential board and care occupancies.
(5) In guest suite living areas.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Hearing Impaired Smoke Alarms

Accessible sleeping accommodations are mandated by Section 4.28.4 of the Americans with Disabilities Act to have a visual alarm attached to the building emergency alarm system or have a standard 110-volt electrical receptacle where such an alarm could be connected. Instructions must be provided for the use of the auxiliary alarm or connection.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Alarm Maintenance & Testing Equipment

According to Chapter 14 of NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, the type of equipment and the local ambient conditions will determine the cleaning frequency of fire alarm system equipment. Also, smoke detectors must be tested with smoke or an aerosol that is listed for that purpose, deemed acceptable to the manufacturer of the smoke detector/smoke alarm, or specified in the published instructions.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Carbon Monoxide Alarms


Chapter 9 of NFPA 720, Standard for the Installation of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detection and Warning Equipment, requires that carbon monoxide alarms or detectors be installed in the following locations:

(1) On every level of a dwelling unit that can be occupied by persons.
(2) Outside of each dwelling unit sleeping area in the vicinity of the bedrooms.
(3) Locations required by state or local laws, codes, or standards.

Each alarm or detector must be mounted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, typically along the wall or ceiling.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Exit & Emergengy Lighting
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Exit & Emergency Lighting
Exit & Emergency Lights



Chapter 7 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, requires that illumination of the means of egress be from a source considered reliable, as determined by the authority having jurisdiction. Emergency lighting facilities for means of egress is required for the following areas:

(1) Buildings or structures as specified in the occupancy chapters of NFPA 101 (see Chapters 11 through 43).
(2) High-rise buildings, as specified in the occupancy chapters of NFPA 101 (see Chapters 11 through 43).
(3) Underground and limited access structures (see Section 11.7 of NFPA 101).
(4) Doors equipped with delayed egress locks.
(5) Stair shaft and vestibule of smokeproof enclosures.

NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, dictates that the authority having jurisdiction judge whether the illumination of means of egress is considered reliable. More information as to specifics of how much emergency lighting is needed in particular areas can be found in other areas of NFPA 101.

Conspicuous signs must guide the way to the exit in all instances where the exit or route to reach the exit is not immediately obvious. When placing new signs, no point in an exit access route is allowed to be more than 100 ft (30 m) or farther than the rated viewing distance, whichever is less, from the nearest sign.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Exit & Emergency Lighting
Maintenance & Components



Chapter 7 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, requires that exit signs must be visually inspected monthly for operation of the illumination sources or must be periodically monitored. Exit signs provided with a battery-operated emergency illumination source must be tested and maintained as follows:
  • Functional tests of at least 30 seconds are required monthly with a minimum of 3 weeks and a maximum of 5 weeks between tests, except the test intervals are permitted to be extended beyond 30 days with the approval of the authority having jurisdiction (the emergency lighting equipment must be fully operational for the duration of the test).
  • Functional tests must be conducted annually for a minimum of 1 1/2 hours (the emergency lighting equipment must be fully operational for the duration of the test).

Records of inspections and tests are required to be kept by the owner and provided upon request by the authority having jurisdiction.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Labels
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Tags
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Commercial Cooking Operations
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Maintenance & Inspection Accessories
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Signs


Chapter 6 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that installed fire extinguishers must be visible, or the extinguisher locations must be marked. This can be accomplished with extinguisher signs with either arrows or words placed on the wall in the vicinity of the extinguisher.

The annex for Chapter 6 of NFPA 10 provides information on acceptable means of identifying fire extinguisher locations that could include arrows, lights, signs, or coding of the wall or column.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Hazard Identification Labels

Chapter 4 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that all fire extinguishers have a label, tag, or stencil attached that provides the following information:

(1) Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) contents' product name.
(2) Hazardous Materials Identification Systems (HMIS) listing of the hazardous material.
(3) List of hazardous materials exceeding 1.0 percent of the extinguisher contents.
(4) List of each chemical exceeding 5.0 percent of the extinguisher contents.
(5) Details on what is hazardous in the extinguishing agent, based on the MSDS.
(6) Manufacturer's or service company's name, mailing address, and phone number.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Inspection Tags



Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that all fire extinguishers be inspected when first being placed in service. They must then be inspected on a monthly basis. Each manual inspection must be accompanied with the recording of the date performed and the initials of the inspector on a tag or label attached to the fire extinguisher, an inspection checklist, or electronic media.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Annual Fire Extinguisher Maintenance Accessories



Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that maintenance be performed on all fire extinguishers annually. Maintenance must also be performed on extinguishers at the time of a hydrostatic test or when an inspection indicates that it is necessary. Part of the required maintenance includes performing a conductivity test on carbon dioxide hose assemblies and immediately replacing hoses that fail. Those hose assemblies that pass the conductivity test must have the test information recorded on a weatherproof label, no smaller than 1/2 in. x 3 in. (13 mm x 76 mm). Once maintenance has been performed, each fire extinguisher must have a tag or label attached securely that details what month and year maintenance occurred as well as the technician and agency that performed the test.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Maintenance Tags
Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that all fire extinguishers must have tags or labels securely attached, providing the month and year that recharging was performed and the person and company performing the service.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher 6-Year Maintenance Labels


Also required in Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, fire extinguishers passing the 6-year maintenance requirement must be labeled with a weatherproof label, on which the maintenance information is recorded. The new label must be attached to the shell of the extinguisher after removing any past maintenance labels. The 6-year labels must be the self-destructive type.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Verification of Service Collars


Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires a "Verification of Service" collar to be located around the neck of an extinguisher that has undergone maintenance that includes internal examination or after the extinguisher has been recharged. The name of the company performing the maintenance or recharge must be printed on the collar. The collar must also include the month and year the service is performed, which is indicated by a hand punch. The "Verification of Service" collar is not required for cartridge-operated or cylinder-operated fire extinguishers or new extinguishers requiring an initial charge in the field, such as stored pressure water, AFFF, and FFFP extinguishers.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Externally Illuminated Exit Signs


Chapter 7 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, requires that externally illuminated exit signs must have the word EXIT, or another suitable word, appear on it in capital letters. New signs must comply with the following criteria:

(1) The letters must be at least 6 in. (150 mm) high and 3/4 in. (19 mm) wide.
(2) The word EXIT must be in letters that are at least 2 in. (51 mm) wide, with the exception of the letter "I".
(3) The word EXIT must have spacing between letters of at least 3/8 in. (9.5 mm).
(4) Larger signs are permitted provided the preceding proportions remain the same.

Additionally, any door, passage, or stairway that is neither an exit nor a route of travel to an exit and is placed or arranged in a way, where it may be confused with an exit, must be identified by a sign that reads NO EXIT.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Material Hazard Signs

NFPA 704, Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response, provides criteria for placards used for marking hazardous areas of industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities that manufacture, process, use, or store hazardous materials.

The system of markings identifies the hazards of a material in terms of health, flammability, and instability. The system indicates the degree of severity by a numerical rating from zero to four. Zero indicates a minimal hazard and four indicates the most severe hazard.
Each rating has a specific color and is placed at an assigned location on the diamond as follows:

(1) Health hazard is blue at nine o'clock.
(2) Flammability hazard is red at twelve o'clock.
(3) Instability hazard is yellow at three o'clock.

The six o'clock position is for special hazards and has no special color assigned to it. Locations of signs must be approved by the authority having jurisdiction. At a minimum, signs must be posted at the following locations:

(1) At least two exterior walls that have a means of access to the building.
(2) Each access to a room or area.
(3) Each principal means of access to an exterior storage area.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Accident Prevention Signs & Tags



29 CFR 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart G, Signs, Signals and Barricades

Section 1910.200, Accident Prevention Signs and Tags

Employers are mandated by 29 CFR 1926.200, Accident Prevention Signs and Tags, to provide accident prevention signs and symbols that must remain visible at all times that work is being performed. They must be removed or otherwise obscured from view once the hazards no longer exist. Danger signs are reserved for areas where an immediate hazard exists.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Hose & Inspection Equipment



Chapter 4 of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, requires that all inspections, tests, and maintenance of a system be recorded and presented upon request by the authority having jurisdiction.

Chapter 6 of NFPA 25 requires that hose, including gaskets, be removed and inspected, then subsequently racked or reeled at intervals specified by NFPA 1962, Standard for the Inspection, Care, and Use of Fire Hose, Couplings, and Nozzles and the Service Testing of Fire Hose. Standpipe and hose system components have to be visually inspected annually, unless otherwise specified in the chapter.

Chapter 4 of NFPA 1962, Standard for the Inspection, Care, and Use of Fire Hose, Couplings, and Nozzles and the Service Testing of Fire Hose, requires that hose designated for occupant use be inspected when placed into service. Hose that is in-service and designed for occupant use must be removed and service tested 5 years after the manufacture date and then at 3-year intervals. Annually, in-service hose must be removed from the rack, unreeled, or unrolled and visually inspected. When the hose is replaced on the rack or reel, and with rolled hose, it must be done so that folds do not re-occur at the same places on the hose. Each length of occupant-use hose must have a record kept on a tag attached to the hose at the female end. The fastening of the tag must not impede deployment or cause damage to the hose.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Wet Chemical Inspection Records



Chapter 7 of NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems, requires semiannual maintenance of installed systems. A tag must be attached to the system that provides the month and year the maintenance was performed and identifies the person who performed the service. Only the current tag is allowed to remain on the system.

Inspections are required on a monthly basis. The date the inspection was performed and the initials of the person performing the inspection must be recorded. The records then must be retained for the 6 months between semiannual maintenance intervals.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Restaurant Hood Cleaning

Chapter 11 of NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations, requires regular cleaning in order to remove grease contaminants and keep hoods, grease removal devices, fans, ducts, and other associated accessories in good working order. Cleaning should take place before surfaces become heavily coated with grease.

If cleaning is performed by an exhaust cleaning company, then a certificate must be maintained on the premises showing the name of the servicing company, person doing the work, and the date the work was performed. Once the cleaning work or inspection has been completed, the exhaust cleaning company and the person completing the work must provide the facility owner any specific areas not cleaned or areas that were inaccessible via a written report.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Restaurant Wet Chemical Portable Extinguisher

Chapter 10 of NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations, requires a placard to be installed near each class K extinguisher, identifying that use of the extinguisher is a backup to the automatic fire extinguishing system in the event of a fire.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Signs, Labels, & Tags
Fire Extinguisher Operating Instruction Labels
Chapter 6 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that the operating instructions must be located on the front of each extinguisher and be clearly visible. The operating instructions must face outward when placing extinguishers inside cabinets or wall recesses.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Extinguisher Parts
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Extinguisher Parts
Fire Extinguisher Installation


Chapter 6 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires that hand portable fire extinguishers be installed in one of the following ways:

(1) In a an approved cabinet.
(2) On a hanger intended for the extinguisher.
(3) In a wall recess.
(4) In a bracket provided by the extinguisher manufacturer.
(5) In a listed bracket.

Cabinets that house extinguishers are not permitted to be locked except where there is a potential for malicious use. Cabinets that are allowed to be locked must be provided with an emergency means to access the extinguisher.

An extinguisher installed under conditions that subject it to become dislodged must be installed in strap-type bracket.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Fire Extinguisher Parts
Tamper Seals
Chapter 7 of NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, requires the tamper seal placed on rechargeable extinguishers to be removed at the time of maintenance, by removing the ring pin. The tamper seal must be replaced following the completion of maintenance with a new listed tamper seal.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Fusible Link & Heat Detection


Chapter 5 of NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems, requires that each protected cooking appliance must have its own fusible link or heat detector above the appliance that is installed in accordance with the listing of the extinguishing system manufacturer.

Fixed temperature-sensing elements of fusible metal alloy type must be replaced every 6 months, from installation date or more frequently, if necessary. These devices must always be destroyed upon removal. Both the year of manufacture of the fixed-temperature-sensing element and the date of installation must be marked on the system service tag that must also be signed or initialed by the person servicing the system.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Shutoff Devices
Chapter 4 of NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems, requires the use of a shutoff device that necessitates the system be manually reset before gas supply or power can be restored to the appliances.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Hood Accessories


Chapter 5 of NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations, requires liquid-tight continuous welds to the hood's lower outermost perimeter for all seams, joints, and penetrations of the hood enclosure that direct and capture grease-laden vapor. Penetrations are allowed to be sealed by devices listed for that use, as long as they do not detract from the structural integrity of the hood or duct. Pipe and conduit penetration fittings, fasteners, and any other devices that require penetration of the hood must be listed in accordance with UL 1978, Grease Ducts.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Nozzle Caps



Chapter 4 of NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems, requires that caps or other suitable devices must be used on all discharge nozzles to prevent grease vapors, moisture, or other foreign materials from gaining entrance into the piping. The caps or other protection devices must blow off, open, or blow out when the extinguishing system is discharged. Chapter 7 requires an inspection that includes checking that the caps are intact and not damaged.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Inspection Forms
Chapter 7 of NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems, requires that maintenance be performed semiannually, on all wet chemical extinguishing systems, in accordance with the manufacturer's installation and maintenance manual. A maintenance report must be filed with the owner, including any recommendations by the person performing maintenance.
Brooks Equipment

Compliance Guide 2.0

Restaurant System Parts
Grease Filters

Chapter 6 of NFPA 96, Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations, requires filters for grease removal in commercial cooking equipment to be listed in accordance with UL 1046, Grease Filters for Exhaust Ducts. Where mesh-type filters are used, they must be listed for use in conjunction with the primary filter.